Sally Fordman: Delusional Thinking and Visualization

(excerpt) 15 year-old Sally Fordman was acquired as a patient by the APC (Albuquerque Psychiatric Clinic) on November 3rd, 2009 after a case of severe delusions. With a family history of panic attacks and schizophrenia, this behavior is not unfounded. She was directed to the APC by her mother, Mary Fordman. The APC has assured the mother that her daughter will continue care for up to one year to diminish the effects of delusions. Background (excerpt) Home Life Sally lives with her mother in a small apartment near the east side of Albuquerque. She has no siblings and her father has not been at home for over 11 years after a tumultuous divorce that was based on illegal drug overuse. Sally is relegated to her room most of the time,…
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Trauma Case Study

Initial Data for the Case (excerpt) It was 3am and you were dispatched from an inner Sydney suburb to a domestic disturbance. On arrival, you found a 24-year-old male, Darren, who had reportedly been shot after a heated argument with another male. Police were on scene and have secured the premises, but have not arrested the assailant. Darren was supine on the kitchen floor in a large pool of blood spreading across the tiled floor around his left shoulder, reaching above the head and down to the hips. The left side of his shirt was heavily bloodstained from shoulder to waist. There was a fine mist of blood spatter across several of the doors of the kitchen cupboards and on the back door, about 1.5 meters away from Darren’s head,…
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Aggression in the Classroom

Classroom aggression is defined as the type of classroom behavior which, in most cases, suggests attacks, hostility, and passive resistance. Unlike the positive drive students strive to master in the classroom environment, classroom aggression is an entirely destructive factor. When it comes to classroom aggression, interactions between individual pupils and the class group has been identified as the most complicated issue that many teachers face. Aggression can have an intellectual basis, whereby the student is searching for their identity, values, as well as their relevance, resulting in classroom aggression (Foy, 1977). For example, in modern secondary schools, classroom aggression has been, as a result of students’ urge, to identify themselves with certain norms and certain standards of behaviors such as: risk taking, rejecting authority and also, as a result of…
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Embedded Marketing as a Powerful Commercial Tool

By Nicholas Klacsanzky When we think about what the word “advertisement,” we commonly associate it with logos, brand names, slogans, and persuasive messages. Traditional advertising is built around these notions since its main purpose is to send a direct, stimulating message to a particular target audience. Embedded marketing is opposite in its principles but practically identical in its purpose and use. And, as it will be discovered in the following case study, research has proven embedded marketing to be a much more powerful tool than traditional advertising. Embedded marketing is often referred to as product placement. It is a powerful marketing technique that essentially means placing a certain product into a particular context and causing a potential consumer to perform a desired action (normally, the action is to purchase a…
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Xenophobia and Islamophobia among European Right-Wing Populist Parties

Hostility towards strangers within European right-wing populist parties has been apparent in its commonness, its virulence, as well as its danger. Xenophobia can be defined as the fear of the unknown, particularly of strangers or foreigners. Islamophobia is one type of xenophobia which relates to the fear of Muslims, as well as their acts. This fear of another nation or minority that is in some way different often develops into hatred and the feeling of one’s own superiority above another person’s background and heritage. Xenophobia and Islamophobia incorporates the hatred of people that belong to a different race, ethnic group, or national origin. Needless to say, such negative attitudes are particularly dangerous within a multinational entity such as the European Union. As reports demonstrate, xenophobia and/or Islamophobia are present in…
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Why Our Ancestors Started to Walk on Two Feet

Around six million years ago, our ancestors began to walk on two feet instead of traveling on four feet. Bipedalism, the act of moving about on two rear limbs or legs, has been seen in various species throughout evolution. Did it make those species smarter? Apparently not. However, in this essay, the task will be exploring the various reasons why our ancestors started being bipedal beings instead of the usual four-limbed walkers. The most accepted theory is that climate change prompted our early selves to stand up to see beyond the tall grass of the savanna for predators, to run away faster from attackers, and also to walk further distances easier. Another theory suggests that we initiated the process of being bipedal in order to walk between trees easier and…
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How the Harry Potter Series Became So Popular

The Harry Potter series, written by J.K. Rowling, is perhaps the most popular set of novels of the modern era. With seven books and many blockbuster films to its name, the series has amassed about 15 billion dollars in sales. How did this phenomenon become what it is? For those scratching their heads, the reason can be broken down into several areas: Rowling garnered a generous initial contract for her book, separate book covers were created for both teens and adults, midnight releases/promotions/pre-orders made the public more fanatic about the series, and fan blogs were rampant. In fact, these are just a few of the main reasons why the Harry Potter took off the way it did. The first book in the series, “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone,” was…
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Why Do People Snore?

Snoring is a natural thing humans and animals do. It can be annoying to sleep around people who snore. Often, people say it is the bane of their existence to hear their husband, lover, or what have you snore throughout the night, ending up with insomnia. That is why many people search on Google, “Why do people snore?” In fact, it is one of the most asked questions on the internet. The common causes of snoring is age, weight, basic biology of the sexes, nasal and sinus issues, taking certain substances (alcohol, smoking, particular medications), and the position of sleep. So, in the following paragraphs, we will get to the bottom of these causes. Let us start with age. Growing older has certain effects on the body, and one of…
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Forward or Defender: Which Soccer Position Contributes More to a Win?

Soccer is a fascinating sport for a myriad reasons: it has changing speeds, dynamics in the variety of player positions, and a hint of unpredictability where a twist of fate can turn the game around. Soccer is no doubt a team game—one can seldom score a goal by dribbling the ball across the field and getting it across the goal line alone. Every player contributes to the overall result—even those players sitting on the substitute bench can contribute to the general winning spirit of their team. Yet, despite the undoubted fact that soccer is a team game, there has consistently been the argument as to who contributes more to a win, and thus, which role is to be considered more valuable: is it the defender or the forward players? I…
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Amazing Prague

The history of Central Europe has fascinated me for several years, though I did not expect it to be as it was described in the books I read about it. You know how whenever an event you anticipate becomes reality, it never lives up to your expectations? When my friend suggested that we go to Central Europe on a summer vacation, I was prepared to be disappointed, even though I was excited about the endeavor. It turned out to be the opposite of my anticipations. Central European opulence and nobleness lingering in the atmosphere, and its architectural and historical allure went beyond my imagination. Out of all the cities and towns we visited in Central Europe, which included Vienna, Warsaw, Munich, Hamburg, Berlin, Budapest, and Krakow, the city that made…
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