Essay Structure

Have you prepared all the materials needed for writing and done all the research? Developed a thesis statement and arranged a list of references? This is not enough to write a successful paper, as simply piling up the facts and cramming them in a given format will most likely negatively affect your final grade. Hence, you must know the necessary basics—essay structure, in particular. Classical 5-Paragraph Essay Structure 1. Introduction – hook (to gain readers’ interest) – background information – thesis statement 2. The first main body paragraph – topic sentence – supporting evidence – explain evidence 3. The second main body paragraph – topic sentence – supporting evidence – explain evidence 4. The third main body paragraph – topic sentence – supporting evidence – explain evidence 5. Conclusion –…
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Relevant Sources

What is Relevance? The relevance of a bibliographic source is its connection with commonly acknowledged requirements, following which allows people to assess a source as credible. Simply speaking, if the sources you used for your paper do not match these requirements, your writing will most likely be declined as not credible.  How to Make Sources Credible? 1. One of the main conditions determining the relevance of any source is the date of publication. Look for the newest sources, as it is believed the newer the source is, the more exact the information it contains (which is not necessarily true). You can find a great piece of useful data in older books—like in those published in the 1980s or even further back; in this case, make sure to ask your instructor…
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Varieties of Sentences

Why is Sentence Variety Important? One of the commonly ignored factors that influence the quality and comprehensibility of an essay is sentence variety. Many writers, especially amateurs, do not pay proper attention to how their writing sounds in general; as a result, it may turn out that a text is monotonous, or precipitous, or too vague. Sentence variety is a nice way to make your writing readable and engaging, and avoid all the aforementioned flaws. Types of Sentences The most basic thing to remember about sentence variety is that there are four types of sentences: 1. Declarative e.g. Dogs bark and chase their tails. 2. Interrogative e.g. What is the meaning of all this? 3. Exclamatory e.g. Wow, that cloud is huge! 4. Imperative e.g. I demand that you look…
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Evidence Support

Supporting evidence is one of the most crucial components of academic writing. Evidence is what makes your claims credible; it is important to support each of your key ideas with facts, scientific research, and other data from external sources. It is important to be aware of the typical flaws regarding this part of academic writing. Typical Difficulties With Supporting Evidence 1. Forgetting to support introduced claims with evidence. Sometimes it occurs that students, due to being exhausted by numerous assignments (or because of being lazy) forget to mention the source they used to acquire information, or even make up their claims. e.g. (unsupported claim) Students tend to forget new facts 25% faster if they feel sleepy. (supported claim) According to recent research conducted by Maryland Imperial University, students tend to…
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Tone in Writing

What is a Tone of an Essay? A tone of an essay is the way it sounds to a reader in general. In most cases, the tone depends on the purpose of your paper; for example, if you criticize something, your tone could be ironic, blaming, or sarcastic. So, whereas words convey meaning, the tone you choose conveys your attitude towards the subject you are writing about. If used properly, tone can be an effective secondary means of expressing your ideas, which can help readers catch all the nuances of your paper. Common Tones The most basic difference that can be made regarding a paper’s tone is its formality and informality. However, you might want to go beyond these limits; in this case, check out the following list of tones…
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How to Write Vague or Detailed

What is Vague Writing? Vague writing stems from writers that have the inability to express exactly what they want to say. Instead of directly and clearly describing key points, such an author would use generalizations, avoid specifics and concrete naming, and prefers to make broad judgments instead of providing detailed facts and evidence. e.g. (Vague) My friend is a highly erudite and educated person. (Strong) My friend has a PhD in nuclear physics from Howard University. Why Should It Be Avoided? Vagueness in writing negatively affects the comprehensibility of the text you are working on, because your audience will hardly understand what you intended to say. In addition, vagueness is a sign of being unprofessional; it also may be annoying to readers―especially for those who value precision and specifics. How to Avoid…
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Vigorous Writing

Writing vigorously means to write concisely. People rarely pay attention to the way they express their thoughts, both orally and on paper; their speech is often polluted with unnecessary words and phrases, or is inappropriately pompous. However, practice shows that almost any sentence can be written more concisely.  Why is It Important? Vigorous writing is directly connected to clarity. The longer the sentence is, the harder it is for a reader to understand the core idea the writer is trying to express underneath their verbal ornaments. One of your main tasks in writing lies in cleaning your sentences from all the unnecessary garbage: numerous words that do not contribute to meaning, inappropriate pomp, parasitic words, lengthy introductory constructions, and so on. How to Write Vigorously? 1. Get rid of redundant…
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How to Avoid Inconsistencies

What is Inconsistent Writing? Imagine you have written three chapters of your novel, describing the main character as a nice person with pleasant manners and a positive background; however, in the fourth chapter, this person suddenly acts completely opposite to what you have so thoroughly described so far. Such an illogical twist is an example of inconsistency—a typical flaw in writing, when an author breaks the inner logic of his or her writing, be it an academic assignment or story, article, and so on. The main rule for consistency in writing is when you choose to write in a certain way, 99% of the time, you have to keep with this choice throughout a certain piece of writing. How to Avoid Inconsistencies? Inconsistency can manifest itself not only in described…
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Balance of Commas

Commas are commonly used either too often or too little. It is a plague in a writer’s style when either of these instances happen. The clarity and smoothness of writing is drastically affected. Though non-native writers are more prone to use commas incorrectly, native writers also appear clueless as well sometimes. One has to remember: the main use of a comma is to avoid confusion in a sentence or phrase. Let’s take some examples: 1. “I have solemnly swore, that this land will be repaired, immediately.” This is a case of too many commas. In fact, we don’t even need commas in this sentence. Without commas, the sentence makes perfect sense and readers do not have to struggle to find meaning in it and do not have a chance to…
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Frequently Misused Words

What is Incorrect Word Usage? Along with words that are usually misspelled (such as “there” and “their,” for example) there is also a group of words whose meaning are usually misunderstood. This leads to a mistake called “incorrect word usage.” Usually it manifests itself either in using one word in the meaning of another, or in using a word with the wrong prepositions, or in the wrong context. Commonly Misused Words 1. Travesty. Rather often, people use this word considering it to mean some sort of tragedy or misfortune. However, the real meaning of the word “travesty” is parody, or even mockery. e.g. (wrong usage) It was such a travesty for him to crash his new bike. (correct usage) Let’s go to the theater tonight! There is a nice travesty…
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